Judge says Lake Naconiche helped slow flooding in Nacogdoches County - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

Judge says Lake Naconiche helped slow flooding in Nacogdoches County

By Holley Nees - bio | email

LUFKIN, TX (KTRE) - Lake Naconiche was built to help slow the flooding of low-lying areas in Nacogdoches County and last week it was tested.

Nacogdoches County Judge Joe English said while parts of the county did see some flooding, it could've been worse. The lake was able to hold hundreds of millions of gallons that would've otherwise flooded Naconiche Creek.

"We calculated that roughly there was about 660 million gallons of water that would've flooded the Naconiche Creeks and actually ended up in the Attoyac River after that," said English.

He said the lake served its purpose.

"This is actually the first rain that we've received in this volume since the lake was built, so this is a true testimony that the lake is working," said English.

"Maybe it stopped some water it wasn't enough to count according to what I saw here, you know, but I mean we're glad to have a lake," said Martinsville resident Mike Mills.  "We can always use watershed lakes."

The Judge said he knows it can't stop all the flooding, but it certainly makes a difference.

"They did receive some flooding, but it would've been a whole lot more if the lake wouldn't have been there," said English.

Elsie Depew lives near the lake and she did get some water last week.

"The backyard, it was like a little bitty lake back there, but it went down fast," said Depew.

As a former New Orleans resident, Depew knows a thing or two about water and she thinks the lake is a good thing.

"I think it's going to help as far as flooding," said Depew.  "Because it's got a place for the water to go."

Thursday, as East Texans make their way down a water-free road, they can know Lake Naconiche deserves some of the thanks.

English said the lake will not always be completely full. The county will keep it down so when flooding rains come they can fill the lake back up and let it off slowly over time.

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