Lovelady girl, 9, says procedure will help her walk again - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

Lovelady girl, 9, says procedure will help her walk again

By Jena Johnson - bio | email

LOVELADY, TX (KTRE) – A 9-year-old East Texas girl is the first cancer patient in Texas to receive a groundbreaking procedure that will magnetically grow her leg. Morgan LaRue lost a portion of her leg to bone cancer earlier this year. She tells KTRE the new device will help her run again.

"[I have] good days and bad days. Some sad days. Some down days," said Morgan LaRue, age 9 and fighting bone cancer.

Sunday wasn't one of those down days for Morgan. It was her first time on a playground since she underwent a revolutionary leg procedure in late March. Her dad said it saved her childhood.

"She could have surgeries for the rest of her life, or until she finished growing and really never been able to be a normal kid," said Jeremy LaRue, Morgan's dad.

It's been seven months since Morgan's practiced her jump shot. Her dad said he can't wait until she's back on the court.

"I think it'll be the first day we got out in the driveway and shoot basketball, he said. "That'll be the best day."

But on and off the court she's competitive. Her parents have watched her battle bone cancer with such courage. "It's also amazing to watch her do this too because you know she's winning at this too,"said LaRue.

When it comes to talking about her cancer, Morgan's a little shy. She let us in on what she calls her biggest secret.

"If you can sit through an MRI without peeing your pants when you gotta go as bad as I do, yeah, you gotta be pretty tough," she said laughing.

Her dad said it's that laugh and big smile that lets them know it's going to be alright.

"She may not be able to do everything she used to do but she'll still be able to get out there and run around and jump and play you know. And have a leg, you know, and be able to go to her prom and dance," he said.

Now, she's ready to ditch those crutches and get back to being a kid. "First walk, second run, third jump, fourth play basketball," said Morgan.

Soon, she'll be able to do all those things.

The device is not yet approved by the FDA in the U.S. The LaRue family fought and received a "compassionate use" exception for Morgan.

©2010 KTRE. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Powered by Frankly