New Psoriasis Drug - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

10/28/03

New Psoriasis Drug

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About 4.5-million Americans suffer from a painful skin disease called Psoriasis, according to the National Psoriasis Foundation.  There's no cure and treatments often carry serious side effects. But, that could be changing. The Food and Drug Administration is deciding whether to approve a new type of drug for this condition.

For more than 20 years, Carol Holland's back, arms, and legs have been covered in a thick red rash that itches constantly. It's a disease called Psoriasis. She couldn't wear short sleeves or shorts. She always long pants, because she felt uncomfortable because everyone was looking at her skin.

She recently she found relief.... in a clinical trial with a drug called Raptiva. Before she knew it, Carol was feeling like a normal person. She had forgotten about her psoriasis.

Psoriasis is caused when an overactive immune system begins to attack the skin. Until now, treating it required light therapy which could lead to skin cancer or medicines that were toxic to the liver or kidneys.

But Raptiva is a new type of drug specially designed to hit the disease at the root of the problem...with minimal side effects. Raptiva is a targeted therapy that actually specifically targets and inhibits a certain aspect of the immune system that's involved in causing psoriasis.

Dr. Tiffani Hamilton has used Raptiva on more than 150 patients in her clinical trials , she say the patients who have been on the medication almost three years, almost all of them are completely clear. Hamilton says it's an improvement over traditional therapies considered successful if a patient got a 50-60 percent improvement.

For more information about Raptiva locally contact Dermatology Associates in Tyler at 903-534-6200.

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