Jackson trial: Pop star DOA, Murray lied about medications - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

Jackson trial: Pop star DOA, Murray lied about medications

Dr. Conrad Murray is on trial for his involvement in Michael Jackson's death in 2009. (Source: CNN) Dr. Conrad Murray is on trial for his involvement in Michael Jackson's death in 2009. (Source: CNN)
Michael Jackson's personal assistant Michael Amir Williams testified that Dr. Conrad Murray wanted to return to the house after Jackson's death. (Source: CNN) Michael Jackson's personal assistant Michael Amir Williams testified that Dr. Conrad Murray wanted to return to the house after Jackson's death. (Source: CNN)
Alberto Alvarez, Michael Jackson's former security guard, testified Thursday that Dr. Conrad Murray asked him to take vials and a saline bag away from the scene of Jackson's death. (Source: CNN) Alberto Alvarez, Michael Jackson's former security guard, testified Thursday that Dr. Conrad Murray asked him to take vials and a saline bag away from the scene of Jackson's death. (Source: CNN)
Firefighter and paramedic Richard Senneff testified Friday that Michael Jackson was dead when paramedics arrived on scene. (Source: CNN) Firefighter and paramedic Richard Senneff testified Friday that Michael Jackson was dead when paramedics arrived on scene. (Source: CNN)
By Theresa Seiger - email

LOS ANGELES (RNN) - Michael Jackson was dead by the time paramedics arrived on scene just five minutes after they were called, according to testimony given Friday in the involuntary manslaughter trial of Dr. Conrad Murray.

Murray lied about what medications Jackson had been taking on the day of his death, according to Richard Senneff, a firefighter and paramedic with the Los Angeles Fire Department who responded to the 911 call at the Jackson residence.

Senneff said Murray never mentioned propofol, the surgical anesthetic that led to Jackson's death, to him or his coworkers.

Emergency vehicles were sent one minute after Jackson's former security guard, Alberto Alvarez, called to get help; they arrived on scene four minutes later. Although Murray allegedly told emergency responders that he called as soon as the performer went into cardiac arrest, Senneff expressed his disbelief at the notion.

"When I first moved the patient, his skin was very cold to the touch," Senneff told prosecutors. "When I first looked at the patient, his eyes were open and dry, and he was flat lining."

Senneff repeatedly asked what medications or underlying conditions Jackson had, as evidenced by the IV stand and oxygen tank in the room.

According to Senneff, Murray told the paramedic, "'I just gave him a little bit of lorazepam [a mild sedative] to fall asleep,'" and that Jackson was being treated for dehydration and exhaustion.

At one point, Murray claimed to have found a pulse on Jackson's upper right leg, but neither Senneff nor another paramedic on scene could find it. Senneff did not see any change in Jackson's condition at any point after he arrived on scene and escorted him to the UCLA Medical Center.

Alvarez, the first man to arrive at the scene of the overdose, did not play as big a part in Friday's testimony as he did in Thursday's.

Thursday's Testimony

Alvarez testified Thursday that he was instructed by Murray to take vials and a saline bag out of the room before paramedics arrived.

Alvarez noticed while he was taking the saline bag away that a small vial containing a milky white substance was inside.

"I thought we were packing - getting ready to go to the hospital," said Alvarez.

The prosecution brought the saline bag, which was recovered from the scene. A slit in the bag was shown to the jury, which Alvarez claimed had not been there previously. Propofol is also administered as a milky white substance.

A bottle of the surgical anesthetic was added to the bag for identification by Alvarez, who testified that the bag looked like the one he had taken from the room.

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