Midlife Anorexia - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

12/30/03

Midlife Anorexia

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by Michelle Mortensen

"I was real heavy, but I never tried to diet. I just one day decided to do it," says Sherry Freeman of Tyler. "And then it got obsessive."

When Sherry Freeman turned 30 years old, she weighed close to 200 pounds. She says she started suffering from depression, and stopped eating.

"Eating wasn't important to me anymore," she explained.

After two weeks of not eating, she lost 15 pounds, which inspired her to try and lose more.

"I was doing 1400 calories a day and exercising once a day," she says. Within a few months, she says, 1400 calories a day turned into 400 calories a week. She also started exercising four to five times a day.

"It was like a game to me or something," she says.

Soon, Sherry got down to 89 pounds.

"I started restricting more and more calories. I was going three days without eating. It was a good day for me if I didn't eat at all," she recalls.

Then one day at church, she says she realized she had a problem.

"I got help when I finally realized I was avoiding communion because of the calories," she says.

Today, Sherry is at a healthy weight, 125 pounds, but she says it took some time to get her there.

"I fought it for so long because I thought only teens get that, I didn't realize older people could get it too," she says.

After counseling, she finally realized what she was doing to her body.

"Here I am killing myself and people with cancer can't help it. If they were in my shoes, they would choose to live, they would choose to eat."

Now Sherry is choosing to eat. She still works out every day, but in a healthy way.

"I have to eat."

She's training for a marathon benefiting people with cancer.

"I have to eat well."

She says helping them has helped her get back on track.

"It's taught me to eat well."

Sherry will run in the team in training marathon benefiting the Leukemia And Lymphoma Society on January 11th.

If you would like more information on the marathon or benefiting the society, you can write:

P.O. Box 27
Winona, TX 75792.

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