Number of Medical Centers Utilizing Surgical Theater Technology Continues to Grow; Now Includes West Coast - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

Number of Medical Centers Utilizing Surgical Theater Technology Continues to Grow; Now Includes West Coast

  • Latest Health NewsThe Latest from HealthDayMore>>

  • Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
  • A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    A little wine might help kidneys stay healthy

    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.More >>
    An occasional glass of wine might help keep your kidneys healthy, new research suggests.More >>
  • HealthMore>>

  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...More >>
  • Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
    Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.More >>
  • Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    Mental illness not a driving force behind crime

    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>
    TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Less than 10 percent of crimes committed by mentally ill people are directly linked to the symptoms of their disorders, a new study shows. "When we hear about crimes committed by people with mental illness, they tend to be big headline-making crimes, so they get stuck in people's heads," said study author Jillian Peterson, a psychology professor at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minn. "The vast majority of people with mental illness a...More >>

Information contained on this page is provided by an independent third-party content provider. WorldNow and this Station make no warranties or representations in connection therewith. If you have any questions or comments about this page please contact pressreleases@worldnow.com.

SOURCE Surgical Theater, LLC

The Surgical Rehearsal Platform combines the science of aviation with CT/MRI imaging technology

CLEVELAND, Feb. 10, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- The number of hospitals using the Surgical Rehearsal Platform (SRP), created by Surgical Theater, LLC, continues to grow and now includes a major healthcare system in California. Some of the hospitals using the cutting-edge technology for complicated brain tumor and cerebral-vascular cases include University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Mount Sinai Hospital and Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center.

"Surgical Theater aims to allow each and every neurosurgeon the ability to "Pre-Live the Future" with an SRP. Using the SRP supports every neurosurgeon's goal of providing their patients with the best possible outcome from what can often be delicate and complicated brain surgery," said Moty Avisar, President and CEO, Surgical Theater. "Our team is honored to have top-rated medical institutions across the country realize the value of our product."

Surgical Theater is applying flight simulation technology to brain surgery and has developed a software-based solution that combines the science of aviation with advanced CT/MRI imaging technology. The company's SRP is a 3D imaging platform that allows a surgeon to perform a real-life "fly through" of surgery before the actual operation. The tissue responds "realistically" to actions taken by the surgeon, enabling accurate pre-surgery planning and rehearsal. The unique software utilizes flight simulator technology to permit the remote connection of multiple SRPs; participants anywhere in the world can simultaneously work together and practice the same case with real-time feedback and collaborate on the planning of a specific surgery case.

Since obtaining Food and Drug Administration clearance in February 2013, Surgical Theater has installed SRPs in leading research and teaching hospitals across the country. Surgeons using the technology are reporting that the images and dynamic and interactive modeling of the patients' cerebral tumor and vascular cases provided by the SRP are unique in their precision. This precision is enabling surgeons to gain clinical insight that was previously unavailable and allowing them to perform enhanced planning and navigation of complex cases. Surgical Theater was also recently featured on CNN as a breakthrough technology in surgery: (http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/bestoftv/2013/05/15/exp-erin-dnt-idea-surgical-theater-flight-simulation-help-perfect-brain-surgery.cnn.html)

About Surgical Theater, LLC
Surgical Theater, LLC is a privately held, Cleveland, Ohio-based startup that produces virtual realistic and interactive scenes where surgeons are able to plan, rehearse and tele-mentor their specific missions. The Company provides the opportunity for novice and experienced surgeons to "pre-live the future" by rehearsing their procedure prior to the actual procedure, similar to what pilots do prior to flying complex missions. Such purposeful practice or warm-up has been shown to benefit both novice and experienced surgeons; it may provide an important new tool in the surgeon's tools to improve patient safety and outcomes. For more information visit www.surgicaltheater.net.

©2012 PR Newswire. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by WorldNow
KTRE logo

KTRE

358 TV Road,
Pollok TX 75969

FCC Public File
publicfile@ktre.com
936-853-8639
EEO Report
Closed Captioning

All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Worldnow and KTRE. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.