NTSB officials release plane crash details - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

NTSB officials release plane crash details

Kevin Coalson Kevin Coalson
Brittany Kerfoot Brittany Kerfoot
Britt Knight Britt Knight
ALBANY, GA (WALB) -

A mechanical engineer with the National Transportation Safety Board released new details as they continue their investigation into what caused the fatal plane crash Saturday. After a recent investigation, it is known that the plane departed for a local flight and reached the height of the trees before it began to descend. 

Officials say they are only in the very early stages of this investigation, and there is a lot of work ahead of them.

Earlier Sunday, officials confirmed the names of the three people killed in the crash. 40-year-old Britt Knight, 30-year-old Brittany Kerfoot, and 48-year-old Kevin Coalson passed away after the 2002 Lancair 4 crashed shortly after taking off.

The NTSB says they will not know what caused the crash, and the investigation could take months. They are currently looking for perishable evidence such as marks on the runway, and looking at weather conditions. 

NTSB mechanical engineer Doug Brazy says they're also asking for help from witnesses.

"We'd be very interested in any witnesses that may have viewed the airplane at any time or heard the airplane yesterday at any time to assist us with our accident investigation," said Brazy.

Over the next few days, NTSB officials will be documenting evidence around the area. Typical accident investigations take up to 12 months. The plane will be transported to Atlanta Air salvage in Griffin on Monday for further investigation.

The NTSB asks that witnesses report what they saw by contacting them here.

Copyright 2016 WALB. All rights reserved.

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