San Augustine Co. residents dealing with washed-out roads, overf - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

San Augustine Co. residents dealing with washed-out roads, overflowing bayous

Ayish Bayou flows in San Augustine and continues another 47 miles through the county. (Source: KTRE Staff) Ayish Bayou flows in San Augustine and continues another 47 miles through the county. (Source: KTRE Staff)
Homes along Highway 96, are blocked by the Ayish Bayou. Its level continues to rise. (Source: KTRE Staff) Homes along Highway 96, are blocked by the Ayish Bayou. Its level continues to rise. (Source: KTRE Staff)
Pictured us just one of many San Augustine County roads and a bridge covered by the Ayish. (Source: KTRE Staff) Pictured us just one of many San Augustine County roads and a bridge covered by the Ayish. (Source: KTRE Staff)
Farm to Market Road 353 in San Augustine County caved in following rainfall up to 14 inches. The road is closed until repairs ae complete.  (Source: KTRE Staff) Farm to Market Road 353 in San Augustine County caved in following rainfall up to 14 inches. The road is closed until repairs ae complete. (Source: KTRE Staff)
SAN AUGUSTINE COUNTY, TX (KTRE) -

After two days of heavy rainfall, Deep East Texans are attempting to dry out.

East Texas News traveled to San Augustine County where waterways are still rising.

The Ayish Bayou flows right through the middle of San Augustine, about seven miles from its headwaters north of town.

This week's 14 inches of rain turned the waterway into a threat for homeowner Jackie Bluford.

"It got to the backdoor,” Bluford said. “I had to stay with my mom last night."

After a flood in 2008, the city of San Augustine widened the Ayish channels.

"These areas like this where we are right now are meant to catch water, so if we can keep it there and not let it backup where it's not supposed to backup, that's the main thing,” said Randy Whiteman, San Augustine’s city manager.

That may be a-near impossible feat where the Ayish where flows for 47 miles through the center of the county.

"All the way from the north end of the county, all the way to the lake down there,” David McEachern, a San Augustine County commissioner.

Road commissioners know the water will continue to rise as runoff from northern counties make its way south.

"I wouldn't even attempt to go across it because you don't know if the bridge is undermined,” McEachern said. “You don't know."

It will be at least Monday before assessments can start on the very same roadways damaged by the 2015 spring floods. Commissioners just finished those repairs.

"I know I'm way up into the thousands of dollar to get my precinct back to where it was and I know the other precincts are in the same shape,” said Joey Holloway, the San Augustine County judge pro-tem.

Other creeks and tributaries are also threatening. FM road 353 caved in leaving about a three-foot ledge. The force of water can do extensive damage if the conditions are right.

Numerous road closures create hazards for motorists. Reducing speed and observing caution signs are important during flooding.

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