San Augustine Co. commissioner says flooding worst he's ever see - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

San Augustine Co. commissioner says flooding worst he's ever seen

Road crews got a full day’s work in on Monday. Commissioner Jackson expects repairs of San Augustine County roads to take at least two months. (Source: KTRE Staff) Road crews got a full day’s work in on Monday. Commissioner Jackson expects repairs of San Augustine County roads to take at least two months. (Source: KTRE Staff)
San Augustine County Commissioner Stanley Jackson stands in front of a creek crossing that washed away during a flash flood.  (Source: KTRE Staff) San Augustine County Commissioner Stanley Jackson stands in front of a creek crossing that washed away during a flash flood. (Source: KTRE Staff)
A hillside that once covered a portion of a natural gas pipeline eroded into a San Augustine County road following last week’s storms. (Source: KTRE Staff) A hillside that once covered a portion of a natural gas pipeline eroded into a San Augustine County road following last week’s storms. (Source: KTRE Staff)
SAN AUGUSTINE COUNTY, TX (KTRE) -

It wasn't until Friday evening that county commissioners could begin accessing the damage in San Augustine County.

That's when the flood waters finally began to go down.

Clear skies are what road crews are needing to make progress in the repair of numerous damaged roads and crossings in San Augustine County.
"This road was about three foot under water where I'm standing right here now,” said Pct. 1 County Commissioner Stanley Jackson. “Like for a day and a half. Just a lot of water comes off these big hills down through here. We had about 11 inches in a matter of 5 1/2 hours."

Jackson says his precinct has the highest altitude and the biggest runoffs in San Augustine County.

Today a person can step over the creeks, but when flash flooding occurs 16-foot drainage pipes can be lifted up, causing roads to cave in. These water breaks called wing walls held, but others just down the road floated down the creek.

"Matter of fact, on one road there was a big lake there close to us and we saw the dam bust on it,” Jackson said.

Another hazard is when a hillside where a natural gas pipeline runs was washed into the roadway. Jackson is concerned.  

"Because their pipeline is exposed in a place or two and that's dangerous because it's got pressure on it,” Jackson said. If we got another downpour or if this mud shifted again it could break a pipeline in two."

Jackson says the moment severe weather is predicted his crews start driving the roads.

"We are on ya'll's app, Channel 9's app,” Jackson said. “When an alert goes out we try to get prepared the best we can, but you just can't get prepared enough for something like this."

The lifetime resident of San Augustine County says he's never seen such severe flooding county wide. It could take up to two months com complete the repairs.

San Augustine County is asking for assistance from the Texas Department of Transportation.
TxDot routinely gives counties grinded up highway, known as RAD, to top rural roads.

In addition, pipeline companies will be asked to repair or pay for the damages left by pipeline erosions.

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