Police shootings weigh heavy on participants of SFA NAACP's pray - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

Police shootings weigh heavy on participants of SFA NAACP's prayer vigil

A prayer vigil by the SFA NAACP promoted solidarity following police shootings in Charlotte and Tulsa. (Source: KTRE Staff) A prayer vigil by the SFA NAACP promoted solidarity following police shootings in Charlotte and Tulsa. (Source: KTRE Staff)
John Davis, State President of Texas Youth and College Division of NAACP says he won’t vote for anyone that supports ‘stop and frisk’. (Source: KTRE Staff) John Davis, State President of Texas Youth and College Division of NAACP says he won’t vote for anyone that supports ‘stop and frisk’. (Source: KTRE Staff)
The SFA NAACP conducted voter registration drives at the university and at the Nacogdoches High School.  (Source: KTRE Staff) The SFA NAACP conducted voter registration drives at the university and at the Nacogdoches High School. (Source: KTRE Staff)
NACOGDOCHES, TX (KTRE) -

Police shootings in Tulsa and Charlotte and racial profiling weigh heavy on the minds of young African-Americans.

Leaders at Tuesday's Stephen F. Austin State University NAACP prayer vigil said the questionable occurrences should be a concern for all Americans.

"We pray that you bless us become stronger in our mind and our spirit,” said Tracy Welcome Jr., an SFA NAACP member.

Prayers of hope and unity set the theme of this gathering of primarily African-American millennial. The message for stopping racial injustices has prevailed for decades, but today it is heard, or rather seen, in an instantaneous way.

"Now you can see it at your fingertips, so I think more people have joined the fight against racial injustices,” said Savian Nugent, the president of SFA’s NAACP chapter.

How to manage those injustices is debatable.

"We have to bring back law and order,” Donald Trump, the Republican presidential nominee said during Monday night’s debate. Now whether or not in a place like Chicago you do stop and frisk which worked very well.”

"And as a college student who is doing nothing but get a college education and be a productive member of society, I'll be damned if I vote for somebody who’s going to let all the cops to stop me when I did nothing,” said John Davis, the state president of the NAACP’s Texas Youth and College Division.”

Police training and a community partnership is another approach to fighting racial discrimination.

"Everyone should be respected by the law, and everyone should respect the law,” Hillary Clinton, the Democratic presidential nominee, during Monday’s debate.

Nugent has taken that proactive effort and reached out to the Nacogdoches police chief.

"We actually had lunch together at Chili's,” Nugent said. “It was quite nice."

The lunch date led to collaboration.

"We want to have an annual cookout,” Nugent said. “We're going to call it the Badges and Ribs Initiative."

And on Tuesday, which was National Voter Registration Day, SFA NAACP continued its ongoing effort to register young voters. Drives happened at the university and the high school.

"The millennial, we don't really have a say so all the time in laws and government and politics, whatnot,” said Brandon Mitchell, a deputized voter registrar. “I feel like we have a say so in America, and us voting is one step."

Hundreds of first time voters in Nacogdoches are now registered to vote, thanks to NAACP and Alpha Phi Fraternity. 

The NAACP members are currently planning several events leading up to Election Day to encourage voters to the polls.

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