Volunteers work to make Nacogdoches' Millard's Crossing even mor - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

Volunteers work to make Nacogdoches' Millard's Crossing even more picturesque

Garden Capital of Texas Committee members and other volunteers plant trees and bushes at Millard’s Crossing Historic Village. (Source: KTRE Staff) Garden Capital of Texas Committee members and other volunteers plant trees and bushes at Millard’s Crossing Historic Village. (Source: KTRE Staff)
Steam rises from a warm pile of mulch in the early morning hours at Millard’s Crossing. (Source: KTRE Staff) Steam rises from a warm pile of mulch in the early morning hours at Millard’s Crossing. (Source: KTRE Staff)
Volunteers say the gardening project provides a sense of ownership and pride. (Source: KTRE Staff) Volunteers say the gardening project provides a sense of ownership and pride. (Source: KTRE Staff)
NACOGDOCHES, TX (KTRE) -

The already scenic Millard's Crossing Historic Village in Nacogdoches is tonight even more picturesque. 

The Garden Capital Committee planted the seeds, so even more beauty will bloom this spring.

Gardeners are naturally optimistic. They plant in the winter, with spring in mind. 

"We're at Millard's Crossing today planting fig trees and antique roses and whatever else will make us more beautiful,” said Mary Louise Jobe, a volunteer.

"Once you plant something, you have an interest in it, and you want to see it thrive and do well, and so we're hoping to keep it going,” said Bill Jobe, another volunteer.

The digging, the planting, and the watering are all the work of the Garden Capital Committee and numerous volunteers. 

"To date since our Garden Capital Committee was formed we've planted over 700 trees in Nacogdoches,” said Angela Wiederhold, the Garden Capital of Texas president. “This was an opportunity to make an impact here at Millard's Crossing."

Money raised from last spring's garden tour pays for the materials. The labor comes free. 

"Thank you sir,” Wiederhold said. “I appreciate it.”

"We like to have things that are native plants and things that are important to the era,” said Roz Couch, the assistant director of the Millard’s Crossing Historic Village. “These are all historic buildings at Millard's Crossing and so it's nice to have things that compliment the buildings."

"It might be good to put it down about an inch,” said Barbara Stump, a volunteer and a former researcher and designer for Stephen F. Austin State University’s Ruby Mize Azalea Garden.

Stump answered questions from volunteers Friday. Now retired, the designer of the SFA Ruby Mize Azalea Garden helps out where she can.

"The big flowered azaleas, the Southern Indicas, would have been planted in southern gardens after about early 1900s,” Stump said. “And maybe late 1800s if people were clever and got plants from Louisiana."

Blooms should arrive this spring, in time for the chapel's wedding season. They’ll mark an optimistic start to a labor of love

The Garden Capital of Texas is always welcoming volunteers. There's a Facebook page.

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