Community helps Boy Scout build a labyrinth - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

Community helps Boy Scout build a labyrinth

Crew helps finish labyrinth Crew helps finish labyrinth
(Source: KTRE) (Source: KTRE)
Crew awaits instruction. (Source: KTRE) Crew awaits instruction. (Source: KTRE)
NACOGDOCHES, TX (KTRE) -

After months of planning and construction, the last steps took place to put together a labyrinth at the Gayla Mize Gardens in Nacogdoches Saturday.

A 17-year-old boy scout coordinated with a professor at Stephen F. Austin to make it happen.

The Nacogdoches high school senior is hoping the project will earn him his eagle rank. Luke Stanley took on a massive project in November when a professor at the university was searching for someone to lead the project for a long time.

"They had the plan for four years and they just couldn't find anyone willing to do it,” Luke said.

Luke’s scout master connected him to a horticulturist professor at the university.

“He told me from the start that it will be a ton of work and so I knew that going into it. He gave me the whole project and laid it out and I liked it a lot,” Luke said.

Together they began plans to build the labyrinth inside the gardens on campus.

"The big thing about the eagle scout project is, it's not necessarily about me, it's not about me coming out here and building a labyrinth by myself, it's about me organizing the community together and getting us to build it as a community,” Luke said.

Luke's parents supported him throughout the winter months even throughout various challenges with a single goal to see him through.

"I look at the people who can say they are an Eagle Scout and think “I wish I could say that’. So anything I can do the help my kids is a big benefit,” said Dan Stanley, Luke’s father.

So far, with at least one ton of gravel poured, Luke and this crew and have clocked more than 400 hours to get to this step.

In the coming week, the final step will be to bind the gravel with a solution.

"The cool thing about Klingstone is, it's actually permeable so when it rains will go through the Klingstone and help water these plants,” Luke said.

Luke’s parent said with this project their son will apply to become an Eagle Scout.

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