SFA Band Camp leaders kept a close eye on Tropical Storm Cindy - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

SFA Band Camp leaders kept a close eye on Tropical Storm Cindy

Dozens of rain ponchos were handed out to SFA Band Camp students in anticipation of heavy rains.. (Source: KTRE Staff) Dozens of rain ponchos were handed out to SFA Band Camp students in anticipation of heavy rains.. (Source: KTRE Staff)
Once students were inside band halls all attention turned to their music. (Source: KTRE Staff) Once students were inside band halls all attention turned to their music. (Source: KTRE Staff)
Dr. David Campo had some stressful moments as he kept close watch on the movement of Tropical Storm Cindy. (Source: KTRE Staff) Dr. David Campo had some stressful moments as he kept close watch on the movement of Tropical Storm Cindy. (Source: KTRE Staff)
NACOGDOCHES, TX (KTRE) -

With Cindy, which has now been downgraded to a tropical depression, making its way out of over our area it raises concerns for some outdoor activities that could be threatened by potential severe weather to come. 

That’s why band camp directors at Stephen F. Austin State University have keep a close watch on the weather radar. It comes with the job when they're responsible for hundreds of pre-teens.

Dr. David Campo doesn't typically watch the weather radar in the wee hours of the morning, except when there's a tropical storm approaching and he's responsible for 450 band campers.

"We've been watching this for the last three days,” said Dr. David Campo, the director of the SFA Lumberjack Band Camp. “Just monitoring it closely and making sure the decisions we made kept the kids safe and communicating with parents."

Fortunately, the emergency plan stopped there. Aside from an hour delay this morning for breakfast, Campo getting his shoes wet that left him, in his stocking feet, and dozens of rain ponchos handed out, the band camp didn't miss a beat. 

"Once we get them inside, they're having band rehearsal right now,” said Tamey Anglley, the assistant director of the band camp. “We're still business as usual and they're having a great time."

Lamar University in Beaumont wasn't so lucky. Band camp there was canceled on the second day. Campo can empathize.

"The first goal of band camp is keep the kids safe. That's our first goal,” Campo said.

"How many of you had to walk through rain?” the band director asked the campers.

Contingency planning provides reassurance. It worked with middle school students and with the Lumberjack Marching Band when it went to the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade a couple of years back.

Campo just doesn't know which was more stressful.

"Two different natural disasters,” Campo said with a laugh.

Band camps are always successful recruiting tools. This fall, the SFA fans will watch the largest Lumberjack Marching Band in the history of the university. Close to 400 musicians are expected.

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