City of Nacogdoches continues mosquito spraying to prevent sprea - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

City of Nacogdoches continues mosquito spraying to prevent spread of Zika

Mosquito control will continue at least thru the end of September. (Source: KTRE Staff) Mosquito control will continue at least thru the end of September. (Source: KTRE Staff)
In Nacogdoches Parks Superintendent Tommy Stanley Jr. (left) and Hector Mendoza (right) share mosquito control responsibilities. (Source: KTRE Staff) In Nacogdoches Parks Superintendent Tommy Stanley Jr. (left) and Hector Mendoza (right) share mosquito control responsibilities. (Source: KTRE Staff)
State Health Services has increased the number of reminders to Texans and municipalities that Zika virus is still a threat. Standing water should be dumped out. (Source: KTRE Staff) State Health Services has increased the number of reminders to Texans and municipalities that Zika virus is still a threat. Standing water should be dumped out. (Source: KTRE Staff)
NACOGDOCHES, TX (KTRE) -

The State Health Services Department doesn't want people to become complacent and let their guard down thinking the Zika virus is no longer a concern.

Here in East Texas, summer rainstorms and pop up showers make mosquito control extremely necessary as East Texas News found out Thursday.  

Nacogdoches Parks employee Hector Mendoza rarely starts a mosquito patrol in daylight. His three-day-a-week shift normally begins around three in the morning, when it's cooler. Heat causes the insecticide to rise.

"That's why you can't spray during the day,” said Tommy Stanley Jr., Nacogdoches’ park superintendent.

That's Hector's boss, Parks Superintendent Tommy Stanley Jr. 

He's been protecting Nacogdoches from mosquitoes for over a decade, so he gets the two-day-a week early morning shift. 

"This is our biomist 4+4 ULV. That's what we use in our sprayers, and it's permethrin and mineral oil,” Stanley said.

It's a deadly combination for full grown mosquitoes placed by a two-man team over an entire city.

The men will remain diligent fogging streets and parks until at least the end of September. They'll also place larvaecide at mosquito breeding grounds. 

Still, every mosquito can't be killed. Prevention is the key, starting with a plea to homeowners. 

"If they see any kind of standing water try to turn the bucket overs, pour it out,” Stanley said.

Stanley believes the public is more aware of the importance of mosquito control.   

"The Zika disease is scaring people, especially with the deformities and the birth of the young babies,” Stanley said.

As of last week, the State Health Services reports 19 Zika cases have occurred during 2017, including two in Smith County. 

The Texas Health and Human Services provides a website dedicated to Zika In Texas.

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