Solar eclipse provides unique science lesson for SFA Charter Sch - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

Solar eclipse provides unique science lesson for SFA Charter School students

Students at the SFA Charter School view the solar eclipse with special glasses. (Source: KTRE Staff) Students at the SFA Charter School view the solar eclipse with special glasses. (Source: KTRE Staff)
Students at the SFA Charter School view the solar eclipse with special glasses. (Source: KTRE Staff) Students at the SFA Charter School view the solar eclipse with special glasses. (Source: KTRE Staff)
Students at the SFA Charter School view the solar eclipse with special glasses. (Source: KTRE Staff) Students at the SFA Charter School view the solar eclipse with special glasses. (Source: KTRE Staff)
Students at the SFA Charter School view the solar eclipse with special glasses. (Source: KTRE Staff) Students at the SFA Charter School view the solar eclipse with special glasses. (Source: KTRE Staff)
NACOGDOCHES, TX (KTRE) -

Many schools in East Texas that kicked off their fall semester Monday, and the solar eclipse provided a perfect science lesson for students.

Stephen F. Austin State University’s Charter School took advantage of the show in the sky, and used it as an educational experience.

However, no logical explanation could contain the children's excitement.

“Looks like a crescent,” one child said.

“It looks like a smiley face,” another child said.

Another SFA Charter School student commented that the partial solar eclipse that was visible in the skies above Nacogdoches looked like an “orange blob.”

“I was just wondering if this is all we’ll be able to see,” a child said.

“Creepy!” a fifth SFA Charter student said.

The descriptions vary, but one thing is certain. The eclipse caused a certain amount of curiosity among these youngsters.

"Come over here guys,” an SFA professor said Monday.

Dr. Tom Calloway, a physics professor at SFA, said he prefers projecting a solar eclipse through binoculars. The scientist said he is pleased people of all ages are interested in the astrological event. 

"Yeah, because that effects the funding, right?” Calloway said. Everybody gets excited. They want science to be fun, so yes, I'm excited about that."

And science students don't take notes.

“It's impressive to see just the scale of it all,” said Connor O’Leary, an SFA physics student.

"The difference between science and messing around is science you write stuff down,” one observer said. 

To get eclipsed in 2017 is a learning experience where “why?' is a question scientists enjoy hearing over and over again. The same kind of questions won't come until April 8, 2024, when a total solar eclipse occurs over Texas. 

"It's going to go right thru Dallas, Texas,” said Ashley Cates, an SFA physics student. “We're going to see the whole thing from here."

These kiddos will be teenagers and hopefully not too cool to express their enthusiasm like they did Monday. 

"Ohh-la-la,” one child said.

Some of the SFA faculty members were in Missouri and Nebraska to see the total solar eclipse. They encourage East Texans to expand their knowledge about astrological occurrences by visiting the SFA Observatory Facebook page. 

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