Nacogdoches hotels filling up with people fleeing Harvey's after - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

Nacogdoches hotels filling up with people fleeing Harvey's aftermath

Connie Beam of Oakridge in North Houston had to cancel plans to return home. Flood waters block all routes home. (Source: KTRE Staff) Connie Beam of Oakridge in North Houston had to cancel plans to return home. Flood waters block all routes home. (Source: KTRE Staff)
Luke Bryan, 7 years old, and his brother Robert prepare to leave Lufkin to try to get closer to their home in Matagorda County. (Source: KTRE Staff) Luke Bryan, 7 years old, and his brother Robert prepare to leave Lufkin to try to get closer to their home in Matagorda County. (Source: KTRE Staff)
Off duty Diboll Police Sgt. Brandan Lovell tries to find a route for stranded Harvey evacuees wanting to return home. (Source: KTRE Staff) Off duty Diboll Police Sgt. Brandan Lovell tries to find a route for stranded Harvey evacuees wanting to return home. (Source: KTRE Staff)
NACOGDOCHES, TX (KTRE) -

Hotels along the Highway 59 route north of Houston are staying near capacity with storm evacuees and others individuals associated with Harvey efforts.

East Texas News visited with evacuees who planned on going home days ago, but remain couped up in hotel rooms.  

Evacuee Connie Beam, her mentally challenged daughter Kristina, and a service dog just thought they were going home to North Houston.

"We're back in,” Beam said.

Within minutes of checking out of Lufkin's La Quinta the three got their room back.  Beam discovered just in time the alternate route she selected home was blocked by floodwaters.  

"I just brought enough stuff for three days and thought we would just go right back and that would be it,” Beam said.

Beam isn't alone. Hotels up and down U.S. Highway 59 are full or near capacity. Robert Bryan and his 7-year-old brother Luke are packing up, just hoping to get closer to their home north of Baytown. 

"Our place is still good, as of right now,” Bryan said. There are reservoirs they're letting go at the dams, so we'll see how that plays out."

Uncertainty is why Charles and Phyllis Summers decided to leave a high and dry home surrounded by floodwaters in Beckville in Panola County.

"Once you get locked in like that, if anything goes wrong, you can't get out,” Charles Summers said

"And also I just wasn't sure about it this time,” Phyllis Summers said.

"Storm evacuees aren't the only ones looking for hotel rooms. At this hotel in Nacogdoches a block of rooms has been reserved by Chevron. They're trying to get their personnel back and forth from refineries, but some waited too late and are stuck down in Houston.

For those stuck in Lufkin, off-duty Diboll police sergeant Brandan Lovell tries to fill a need. 

"Just takes one call to let somebody know what they need, and it's already on its way up here,” Lovell said.

"Lufkin has been ... thank you,” Beams said. God Bless y'all."

Many hotels in East Texas hold accounts with FEMA. 

This means any guest assigned a FEMA account number can have their lodging directly billed to the agency. 

Evacuees are advised to register with the government agency as soon as possible in the event they are eligible for evacuation reimbursement. 

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