Nacogdoches women express concerns for those in migrant caravan

Giron was born in the U.S. and her parents are seeking American residency, but an extended family lives in Honduras. (Source: Maryori Giron)
Giron was born in the U.S. and her parents are seeking American residency, but an extended family lives in Honduras. (Source: Maryori Giron)
Maryori Giron (l) and Evelyn Sauceda, both of Nacogdoches have a unique perspective of the migrant caravan. Sauceda immigrated from Mexico to the U.S. at age 16. The NISD Bilingual Services Director is seeking a doctorate. (Source: KTRE Staff)
Maryori Giron (l) and Evelyn Sauceda, both of Nacogdoches have a unique perspective of the migrant caravan. Sauceda immigrated from Mexico to the U.S. at age 16. The NISD Bilingual Services Director is seeking a doctorate. (Source: KTRE Staff)

NACOGDOCHES, TX (KTRE) - East Texans with ties to Mexico and Central America are watching developments of the migrant caravan from a unique perspective.

East Texas News spoke with several women who understand fully what the migrants are seeking. 
Maryori Giron calls up a cousin who lives in Honduras.

Normally, it's small talk, but today a serious question, via Facetime, is asked of Karina Navas. Why are hundreds from Central America seeking asylum in the U.S.?

"There's no education," Giron said. "There's no money. "There's no jobs, so they risk their lives."

Giron was born in the united states. She travels periodically to Honduras to visit a large extended family. Immigration is an awkward topic when they get together. Giron has a good life, while at least one Honduran cousin is threatened by gangs.
 
"He actually had to move," Giron said. "They know who you are. They will find you."

Evelyn Sauceda immigrated from central Mexico to the United States at age 16.  The Nacogdoches ISD immigrant and bilingual programs director uses that experience in her job. She's prepared to help migrants if they make it as far as Nacogdoches.

"Forty-eight percent of our population is Hispanic either from Mexico or Central America, so it's really important for us to not only be able to understand what's going around, but also to understand their perspective," Sauceda said.

It's uncertain how many, if any, of the migrants will be successful in moving to the U.S.

East Texas News spoke to Navas via Sauceda, who was interpreting for her.

"Number one, the people that are at the border they would have to prove that their lives are at risk," Navas said. "She was saying that for some of them, it is going to be hard to prove."

These women have all the proof they need. 
Giron watches the news about conditions in Central America, but she believes most about what her Honduran family is willing to share.

Sauceda is currently seeking a doctorate in education.

Giron is attending Angelina College while working at NISD.

She's looking forward to her parents reaching resident status after 24 years in the U.S.

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