Tornadoes - KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

Tornadoes

A tornado is a violently rotating column or air in contact with the ground.  When the column of air is not in contact with the ground, it is called a funnel cloud.  A tornado in contact with a water surface is called a water spout.  Tornadoes can vary greatly in size, intensity and appearance.  Wind speeds in a tornado can range from just less that 100 miles per hour to over 200 miles per hour.  The intensity of a tornado is classified using the Fujita scale. 

TORNADO TERMS YOU SHOULD KNOW

  • TORNADO WATCH -- The formation of tornadoes is possible within and near the watch area.
  • TORNADO WARNING -- A tornado has been spotted on the ground or by Doppler radar.  If you are in the warning area, you should take action immediately to protect your life and the lives of others.

 

WHAT SHOULD I DO TO STAY SAFE DURING A TORNADO?

  • IN YOUR HOME
    • Go to a basement or interior room on the lowest floor.  A small windowless bathroom or central closet is a good place if you do not have a basement in your home. 
    • Use blankets and pillows to protect yourself from flying debris.
    • Listen to KTRE or NOAA Weather Radio for an all clear and updates on the weather.
  • IN A SCHOOL
    • Go to an interior room or hallway on the lowest floor of the buidling.
    • Stay away from windows!
    • Stay away from areas with wide-span roofs such as auditoriums and gyms.
    • Make a severe weather plan for your school NOW before severe weather strikes!
  • IN A MOBILE HOME
    • A mobile home is NOT a safe place to be during a tornado.  You must leave the mobile home and seek shelter in a substantial shelter.
    • If substantial shelter is not available, lie flat in the nearest ditch with your hands covering your head.
  • IN YOUR CAR
    • Do NOT try to outrun a tornado in your car!
    • Abandon your vehicle and go to the nearest substantial shelter.
    • If a nearby substantial shelter is not available, lie flat in the nearest ditch with your hands covering your head.
    • Seeking shelter under a highway overpass is NOT safe!
  • OUTSIDE
    • If you are caught outside and cannot get to shelter, lie flat in the nearest ditch with your hands covering your head.

 

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