East Texas lawmaker files bill to require civics exam for high school graduation

East Texas lawmaker files bill to require civics exam for high school graduation

LUFKIN, TX (KTRE) - High school students in Texas could soon be required to pass a civics test in order to graduate.

Texas State Rep. Trent Ashby, R-Lufkin, filed the proposal this week in Austin.

If the bill becomes law, students will be tested on how the American government operates and the responsibilities of citizenship.

“Such things about how our government works, who we are a nation, how we got here. Things that every student should know to be ready for active, engaged citizenship in this country,” Ashby said.

Under House Bill 1244, students would take a civics exam of about 100 questions and eliminate the United States history end-of-course assessment.

“I think it’s very important because I see in students my age, people don’t care, and so for us to be able to succeed in the future as the great country we are, we have to have an educated citizenry,” said Greyson Gee, a Hudson ISD senior student.

Ashby's proposal requires a student to answer at least 70 percent of the questions correctly.

“This bill will help our teachers by allowing the to focus on the critical and essential knowledge that should be taught in U.S. history and worry less about teaching to the TEKS test,” Ashby said.

In Austin, a total of 2,262 bills have been filed so far this legislative session. On average only about 10 percent of those will become law.

Copyright 2019 KTRE. All rights reserved.