East Texas soldier missing in Korean War identified through DNA

U.S. Army 1st Lt. George S. Crisp reported missing nearly 70 years ago

East Texas soldier missing in Korean War identified through DNA
U.S. Army 1st Lt. George S. Crisp, of Alba, was accounted for on Sept. 3 through DNA analysis, according to a press release from the agency. (Source: SOURCE: Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency)

TYLER, Texas (KLTV) -The body of an East Texan missing in action and presumed killed in the Korean War nearly 70 years ago has been identified by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.

U.S. Army 1st Lt. George S. Crisp, of Alba, was accounted for on Sept. 3 through DNA analysis, according to a press release from the agency.

Crisp will be interred in Arlington National Cemetery, but a date has not yet been set.

The body of an East Texan missing in action and presumed killed in the Korean War nearly 70 years ago has been identified by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.
The body of an East Texan missing in action and presumed killed in the Korean War nearly 70 years ago has been identified by the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. (Source: SOURCE: Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency)

Crisp was listed as missing in action on Dec. 2, 1950, following intense fighting with the Chinese People’s Volunteer Forces at Sinhyung-ri, near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea. The remains of the 24-year-old could not be located at the time, and he was presumed dead on Dec. 31, 1953. The Department of Defense declared Crisp deceased as of Dec. 12, 1950.

“Due to internal chaos within the unit due to high losses, it is impossible without eyewitness confirmation to have a specific date of actual loss,” according to records kept by the Dallas-based Korean War Project.

A rosette will be engraved next to Crisp’s name on the Courts of the Missing at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu to show that he has been accounted for, the agency said.

In July 2018, North Korea turned over 55 boxes that contained the remains of American service members killed during the Korean War. The remains were delivered to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Hawaii and sent to the DPAA laboratory for identification.

To identify the remains, scientists use anthropological analysis, including circumstantial and material evidence, and DNA analysis.

Today, 7,606 Americans are unaccounted for from the Korean War, according to the agency tasked with identifying the remains.

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