Mark in Texas History

  Mark In Texas History: Green Bay Church and School

This week, Mark Scirto tells us about a church which started a segregated school in Anderson County.

  Mark in Texas History: Lufkin Civilian Conservation Corps Camp provided Depression-era jobs

  Mark in Texas History: ‘Big Inch’ pipeline turns 78

  Mark in Texas History: Confederate Capital of Missouri

  Mark in Texas History: Smith County rose industry

  Longview Train Depot still chugging

  Mark in Texas History: Stone Fort Museum in Nacogdoches

Continued Coverage

  Mark in Texas History: Jarvis Christian College

Mark in Texas History: Downtown Lufkin

  Mark in Texas History: First Baptist Church Winnsboro

  Mark in Texas History: Old Smith County Jail

  Mark in Texas History: Joe Weisman & Company

  Mark in Texas History: Texas State Railroad

  Mark in Texas History: Anderson County Poor House

You may have heard the phrase, “it put me in the poorhouse.” And like many figures of speech, it has a history behind it.

  Mark in Texas History: Augus Theatre in San Augustine

Behind the Pine Curtain lies the city of San Augustine which contains the subject of this week’s Mark in Texas History by Mark Scirto.

  Mark in Texas History: Killough Massacre Historical Marker

Monday will mark 182 years since 18 people disappeared in the Killough (Kill-oh) Massacre.

  Mark in Texas History: Select Theater in Mineola

Celebrities like Sissy Spacek have been an audience for it, while others like Kacy Musgraves have been the show. It’s formerly the Select Theater in Mineola and it’s the subject of this week’s Mark in Texas History with Mark Scirto.

  Mark in Texas History: Henderson County Historical Society once housed Athens City Hall

  Mark in Texas History: The Everett Building in Longview

  Mark in Texas History: Tyler Tap Railroad

  Mark in Texas History: Love’s Lookout in Cherokee County

  Mark in Texas History: The Ginocchio Hotel

  Mark in Texas History: First Baptist Church of Whitehouse

  Mark in Texas History: Lillian Richard, one face of Aunt Jemima brand, lived in Hawkins

he Black Lives Matter movement persuaded Quaker Oats to rebrand the 130-year-old Aunt Jemima syrup. But the history lives on in Hawkins, where one of the women who portrayed the character resided. Lillian Richard is the subject of this week’s Mark in Texas History with Mark Scirto.

  Mark in Texas History: Slocum Massacre Historical Marker

The Slocum Massacre historical marker is on the west side of FM 20-22 in Slocum, a small town in Anderson County.

  Mark in Texas History: Lufkin Industries was once cornerstone manufacturer for Angelina County

Lufkin Industries used to be the cornerstone manufacturer of Lufkin and Angelina County before a GE merger, followed by the oil market drying up.

  Mark in Texas History: Collins-Shotwell House

This two-story bungalow built in the 1920s features brick piers and some unusal window patterns but the story behind the wood of this home is unique.

  Mark in Texas History: Driller Park in Kilgore

Driller Park was erected in 1947 and hosted the Kilgore Drillers for four years.

  Mark in Texas History: Camp Ford

Camp Ford is named in honor of Colonel John Ford, who originally established a training camp in 1862. It was converted to a prison camp in the summer of 1863.

  Mark in Texas History: Gilmer Post Office

The 1925 Gilmer Post Office was designed by James Westmore, who oversaw the designing of at least 2,000 federal government buildings.

  Mark in Texas History: Ebenezer United Methodist Church in Marshall

The city of Marshall has quite a history of its own. On the west side of town is a church which has been serving the community since 1867.

  Mark in Texas History: Hotel Wiley in downtown Garrison

The Hotel Wiley was designated a Texas Historical Marker in 1999.

Mark in Texas History: Prairie Grove community of Angelina County

The former Prairie Grove Baptist Church was built in the 1880s. It received the historical designation in 1996.

  Mark in Texas History: Camp Fannin celebrated today

Camp Fannin was named in honor of Colonel James Walker Fannin, the Texas independence hero. According to its website, more than 200,000 young American men trained here between 1943 and 1945.